Why Writers Should Have YouTube Channels | Web Design Relief

Why Writers Should Have YouTube Channels | Web Design Relief

As a writer, you may think YouTube isn’t a worthwhile platform for reaching out to your readers and building an audience. Think again—your readers love to watch videos! The media experts at Web Design Relief know that YouTube has over a billion users, and it’s currently the second most popular platform after Facebook. Here are more reasons why writers should have YouTube channels.

Why More Writers Are Creating YouTube Channels

More Exposure: The more times you show up in an Internet search, the better! Along with your social media platforms and author website, having a YouTube channel helps you reach a wider audience and makes you more findable by literary agents and editors. Since YouTube is owned by Google, it also sends traffic to YouTube channels. If a potential new reader conducts an online search for your topics or writing style, Google will display your YouTube channel in the search results. Be sure to keep your content fresh and interesting so visitors to your channel choose to become subscribers! Here are innovative ways to increase your visibility on YouTube.

Better Engagement: Readers who visit your YouTube channel are actively searching for your specific type of content, so your videos will command more of their attention and generate more responses and interaction. Plus, unlike posts on social media that can be buried under other posts and lost forever, YouTube videos will always pop up in a search if the topic is relevant. Visitors who watch your videos are obviously interested in you and your writing, so asking your YouTube audience to sign up for your e-mail list or newsletter is another great way to connect and grow your fan base.

Increased Readership. If you provide quality content on a consistent basis, your regular readers will be delighted with your channel and new readers who browsed in for one topic may stay and watch your other videos. Visitors who enjoy your content and subscribe to your channel will receive notifications whenever you post new content. Viewers who watch your YouTube channel are more likely to share your content with other booklovers and literature fans, bringing you and your writing to the attention of new readers—and potential new subscribers!

Joining Is Free: There’s no cost to create your YouTube channel and start posting videos. You can build your readership, become more visible in online searches, and engage your followers without spending lots of your hard-earned cash. YouTube does offer the option to purchase ads, but it’s not necessary to pay to play.

Bonus: Once you develop a substantial following on your YouTube channel, you can choose to monetize your videos so they can generate income for you! And while making a living from YouTubing is rare, you may bring in enough money to buy that new journal you’ve had your eye on.

YouTube Videos Can Be Reused: You can take the videos you create for your YouTube channel and embed them on your author website and into blog articles, as well as feature the videos on your Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts. Since videos are popular on social media platforms, you’ll capture your followers’ attention more effectively in their feeds.

A YouTube channel is a great way to connect with your audience and grow your following. And you don’t need to have expensive video equipment or expert camera skills to get started! You can read some of your published work, answer questions about your writing process, give writing tips and advice, and much more. It’s a great way to stand out and be noticed!

 

Question: Which authors do you follow on YouTube?

9 Blogging Mistakes To Avoid—And The Easy Fixes | Web Design Relief

9 Blogging Mistakes To Avoid—And The Easy Fixes | Web Design Relief

Blogging is a smart way for writers to grow their audience. But just because you can write a great short story, poem, or novel doesn’t mean you’ll also be a natural at writing and maintaining an interesting blog. The experts at Web Design Relief know that new bloggers as well as those who have been blogging for a while can make some common mistakes. Here are the 9 biggest blogging mistakes to avoid, along with the easy fixes!

Common Blogging Mistakes To Avoid

Posting Only For Yourself

Your blog is not a diary! While it’s important to enjoy what you write about, your posts must be geared toward a wider audience. Talk about what your audience wants to know—not just what you want to tell them. Your content should be user-focused and educate, instruct, or entertain so visitors will want to return again and again to read your latest blog entry.

Constant Repetition

Your blog posts should make a point. It’s important that they have a point. One thing your post should definitely include is a main point. Do you see how annoying this is to read? While some repetition helps with SEO, don’t get carried away. Be sure to have something meaningful to say without reiterating the same information over and over again and again. The same goes for your blog topics—posts offering a range of topics will be more interesting than fifty-three posts about what to name a particular character.

If you search for your blog topic on the Internet and find thousands of similar blog posts, you might want to consider writing about something else—or choose a new angle for familiar content. You don’t have to reinvent the wheel, but try to keep your content fresh. If you need some inspiration, check out these forty blog post ideas.

Not Professional Looking

The writing for your blog articles should be conversational and casual, not stiff and formal. But that doesn’t mean you can skip formatting your posts! Your blog style should be professional and consistent. For example, if you title your posts, make sure you title ALL of your posts. Similarly, you should use the same design theme for each post.

Incorrect Length

You shouldn’t try to write a 50,000-word novel on your blog, because no one wants to read an overly long post. But your post shouldn’t be just three or four sentences, either—put something so brief on social media instead! A good rule of thumb is to aim for about 500 to 1,000 words per blog article.

Wrong Font Choices

Your font and the size of the typeface you use can make or break the readability of your blog post. If your text is too small, readers will have to zoom in to see your post. Likewise, using overly large text or fonts will have your visitors scrolling excessively or trying to shrink your posts. Choose a text size that visitors can read without adjusting—12 point often works well.

Avoid fonts that are too decorative, and don’t make your text the same or nearly the same color as your background. You can’t go wrong using Times New Roman or Calibri in black on a white background.

Posting Inconsistently

Whether you post once a month, once a week, or every day, choose a schedule that works for you—and stick to it. If you post every day for a week, then skip two weeks and post once, then don’t post anything for a month, your followers won’t know when to return to read your next installment. Being inconsistent when posting is one of the main ways that blogs lose readers. Use a calendar to plan your posts in advance.

Inaccurate Information

 The only thing worse than a “this is old news” blog post is one that’s littered with incorrect information. Unless you are an expert on your topic, you should research your blog articles and include links and references for your readers. Your blog posts are more worthwhile to your audience when based on data that supports your claims. If you post inaccurate information, you risk damaging your credibility with your followers.

Being Unresponsive

When a reader comments on your blog, they’re often hoping to receive a response. When you don’t take the time to interact with your followers and respond to their comments, it limits all future engagement from your audience. Fans who get a response will feel a personal connection with you and your blog and are more likely to return.

If you’re not getting any comments, here are some tips on how to get people to comment on your blog.

Not Proofreading

Your blog article isn’t a casual throwaway piece—it’s an important way to build your audience and connect with your fans. Make sure your blog posts are proofread and edited just as thoroughly as your short stories, essays, poetry, or book. A post filled with typos and poor grammar will reflect poorly on your writing as a whole. A sloppy post will lose readers and leave any visiting literary agents or editors unimpressed.

Blogging can be a fantastic marketing tool and a way to stretch your creative muscles. Avoiding these common blogging mistakes will help you grow a larger audience and effectively engage your readers.

 

Question: Which blogging mistake do you see most often on blogs?

15 Best Websites To Help Writers Succeed | Web Design Relief

15 Best Websites To Help Writers Succeed | Web Design Relief

Today almost any information a writer might need is only a click away on the Internet. Whether you need writing tips, or to research your character’s hometown, or want to know how to start a blog, you’ll find websites hoping to answer your questions. The experts at Web Design Relief have searched the Internet to bring you the top resources and best websites to help writers succeed (including a close-to-home favorite!).

The Best Websites For Writers

The Write Life. Whether you have questions about publishing, freelancing, or blogging, you can find the answers here! The folks over at The Write Life also have their own helpful roundup of best websites for writers (psst!—Writer’s Relief is one of them!).

Grammar Girl. For all your grammatical questions, no matter how complex, Mignon Fogarty—aka Grammar Girl—has the answers!

Editors’ or agents’ blogs. Reading editors’ and agents’ blogs will help you learn about what types of submissions they are interested in.

NaNoWriMo. Writing a novel in just a month? We know it sounds stressful, but the object of NaNoWriMo is to do just that, and many writers say it’s the most fun they’ve ever had! The organization’s website, complete with tips and loads of connections to other writers, certainly helps relieve the stress of pounding out 50,000 words in thirty days.

Pitch Wars. In this mentorship program, volunteer authors and editors choose writers to mentor and offer advice on improving their manuscripts.

Freelance Writing. Whether you want to hire a freelance writer or become one yourself, this site is full of job postings and resources!

Writers In The Storm. This group of seasoned authors has the experience and resources to help you in your struggles through your own personal writing storm. There’s lots of useful information on this blog for aspiring writers about craft and inspiration.

Beyond Your Blog. If you’re thinking about starting a blog (or already have one), this website features lots of tips for writers in many different genres.

AAR. The AAR, or Association of Authors’ Representatives, holds literary agents and playwrights’ agents to a stringent standard to best protect writers. The site can be used to answer questions about procedures, contracts, and much more about the publishing industry.

DIY MFA. Earning an MFA can be expensive. This website believes that the basics of a Master of Fine Arts is simply Writing + Reading + Community = MFA. There’s plenty of information here to help you excel in each category!

Six-Word Memoirs. Inspired by the famous, ultra-short Hemingway story (“For sale: baby shoes, never worn”), Six-Word Memoirs challenges writers to use this same micro-format to tell a complete story. If you’re in a writing rut, this is a great way to get your creative juices flowing again!

How To Type. Never learned how to type? This website is full of tutorials, lessons, and typing exercises—and it even lets you practice by typing quotes from famous novels!

A writers’ organization for your region or genre. Find a writing group to join based upon your genre and stay connected with members online. SCBWI (the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators), RWA (Romance Writers of America), and SFWA (Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America) are all great examples! Many of these national organizations have regional groups.

Baby Names. When you just can’t think of the right name for your character, perusing a list of popular baby names is a great way to be inspired! 

Writer’s Relief—of course! Part of our company family and definitely a worthy resource for every writer. The Write Life has chosen Writer’s Relief as one of the top 100 best websites for writers for several years in a row! Writer’s Relief has been successfully helping writers of poetry, short prose, and books meet their publishing goals since 1994. As of this article’s writing, clients have received 21,406 acceptances from literary journals and requests from agents. Listen to testimonials of happy clients here.

 

QUESTION: What’s your favorite online resource for writers?

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