The Psychology Of Using Color In Website Design | Web Design Relief

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The Psychology Of Using Color In Website Design | Web Design Relief

As a writer, the written content of your author website will get a lot of your attention. You’ll want to be sure it’s intriguing and typo-free. But the tech experts at Web Design Relief know there’s an important website design element that some writers overlook: The colors you use will have a big impact on how visitors perceive your website. Color engages the brain in multiple ways and can affect the entire mood of your author website. Knowing the right colors to use will help you effectively tempt visitors to explore your site, interact with your information, and maybe even buy a book! Here’s how to successfully use the psychology of color in your website design.

The Psychology Of Using Color In Your Author Website Design

Use A Color Wheel

Knowing how to use a color wheel is a necessary step in the web design process. For example, when you understand contrasting colors (like purple and yellow) or complementary colors (like red and orange), you can use that information to plan your color palette. Contrasting colors will draw your visitor’s eye to your key points, while complementary colors can influence the overall cohesion of your design.

Know Your Audience

Colors mean different things to different people. A prime example is the color yellow. For adults, yellow is an unappealing color associated with warning labels and caution signs—yet it’s a favorite among children. Purple is often more appealing to women and less appealing to men, and vice versa with gray. Colors also fade in and out of popularity, so take a look at current trends in home décor and fashion when choosing your website’s color scheme.

Break It Down By Genre

Certain genres are associated with specific colors. Bright colors are more likely to catch the attention of a younger audience and work well on children’s books’ websites. On the opposite end of the spectrum, dark colors like black, navy, maroon, and indigo can be used to establish an ominous, foreboding mood—perfect for horror, mystery, or thriller writers. If romance is your genre, consider using soft, floral colors like lilac and rose pink. Check out more examples of smart color use here:

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Count On True Blue

Still not sure what color you want to feature on your author website? Blue is a consistently popular color choice for websites because it appeals to all genders and ages and is associated with a calm mood and a strong sense of trust. Take a look at some of the most popular sites on the web like Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Amazon (the book-selling machine!)—you’ll notice the color schemes are overwhelmingly blue.

Avoid Fifty Shades Of Gray And Other Monochromatic Blunders

Once you’ve decided on the prominent color for your author website, it’s important to include some visual variety. A well-designed monochromatic website can be striking, but don’t overuse one single color to the point that it loses its intended effect. Instead, choose a palette that features both contrasting and complementary colors. Check out some attractive color palettes here.

See In Black And White

Did you know that black and white technically aren’t colors? They’re shades! These shades are design staples because they work with all colors in the spectrum—and should be important elements in your website’s design. White space makes it easier for visitors to focus and read your content, while a smart use of black will make your author website look more formal and professional.

How To Apply Color Theory To Your Design Elements

Headers and Footers: The best place to showcase your personal branding is in your header and footer. This is where you should feature your name and branded images or logos—which means they are the most effective places to feature your colors of choice. Remember to highlight your personal branding with colors that align with the genre of your writing.

Backgrounds: Your background is the design element your audience will see the most, since it’s on every page! A white background offers the best legibility for your text, but you can use color if it’s muted enough that your content still stands out.

Buttons and Links: Your buttons and hyperlinks are your calls-to-action—and this is where you definitely want to catch your visitor’s eye. Avoid complementary colors and instead focus on contrasting colors to make sure your buttons and links grab attention and stand out.

While color is an important element of website design, remember there can be too much of a good thing. Avoid making your website a busy, crowded rainbow where visitors won’t know what to focus on or be able to mentally connect to the proper genre.

If you’d rather leave your author website color selection to the design experts, Web Design Relief can help! Sign up for a free consultation today!

 

Question: What is your favorite color palette for a website?

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